Tag Archives: product design

Bee9 Design

Students, young adults, or anyone living in a smaller space know how valuable it is if we had just a little bit more room in our studio, bedroom, or wherever. Maybe just 10 more square feet in the corner. A couple of of Unbranded members have found solutions to this problem, one being the Three in One  by designer Kai-ning Huang (read more about this design on our blog post). When dealing with a desk, it’s not difficult to figure out how to accomplish this task – restaurants do it all the time. Yet, it’s how you do it and how you present it, that makes the difference.

A UK (West Yorkshire) based design studio called ‘bee9‘ has created such a desk called Tablet Desk 2.0, which every college dormitory desperately needs. The mechanics of this product are essentially the same as any other fold-up desk you would see in restaurants. However, this one has its perks and is catered to people like us – students, professionals, workers.

31_DSC_0231

31_DSC_0242

In its ‘standard’ position, you wouldn’t think of it as being special or different. It may even look more like a shelf than a desk. There’s a body, and a top surface that’s cut into the blocks so you can customize it however you want. Then after playing around with it you realize that this thing is pretty awesome. The body folds up and two legs come down. The applications for this table are pretty standard but essential to daily life. No wonder this company is called bee9, its product provides a gentle and benign experience with limited space.

31_DSC_0387

31_DSC_0307

31_DSC_0284

Tagged , , , , , ,

One Shot

It always brings a wonderful feeling to come across a product that’s functional and still materialistically lean. It inspires something inside to heighten the push to create bolder, cleaner, and simpler design solutions.

ONE-SHOT_06_1_1383671068

Jasheng Wong, one of our Unbranded Designers, is the craftsman of the recently popular piece, One Shot. It’s sudden increase in likes from our community from jumping to one of the top three submissions is a testament to its wonderful design. The part that makes this piece incredible is the fact that the product is built with one piece of sheet iron. And on top of that, it only requires three simple manufacturing processes to complete it – laser cutting, metal stamping, and bending. It’s hard to get any better than that. From a manufacturing and production point of view, One Shot is golden. The design also holds a limitless number of smooth and clean lines and geometric shapes that are amplified or hidden depending on your point of view.

ONE-SHOT_JashengWang_additional_1383671068

From reviewing the comments, however, there are some worries that Wong’s design is more unstable than it should be. Our Unbranded Designer, Seizmic Design wrote, “Materials are certainly your biggest concern. In a close second is going to be the strength of that break at the bottom trying to support all the physics going on above. One solution might be to have two or three feet instead of just one. One way this could perhaps be done is by breaking the center foot only out of the back and breaking two feet out of the front. I think you will also wind up having to go from having a perfect radius at the bottom (which looks awesome) to having at least a little bit of a flat area (which wouldn’t look as hot, but would be more stable),” which numerous people agreed with.

Tell us what you think to help One Shot become the greatest version of itself!

ONE-SHOT_05_1_1383671068

ONE-SHOT_03_1_1383671068

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Functional Art

As an industrial designer, there’s a fine line that cannot be crossed between creating something catered for a user and something that is simply art. Amazingly, designer Axel Yberg has found a gray area, which he calls ‘functional art.’

invino_sm_1

By taking a look at Yberg’s portfolio, it’s definitely hard to stop looking at his work and to stop wondering how in the world does he think of these detailed, intricate, and ultimately beautiful pieces. The main elements he utilizes are metal and wood or ‘industrial and organic’ as he labels them. Yberg views these two juxtaposing materials representing something more harmonious and poetic. The use of metal symbolizes control and deliberation. He decides how to cut it, how to shape it, and what type of surface finish it should have. On the other hand, his use of wood represents the more spontaneous, natural, and hidden dimension of his craft. A slab of wood has already lived a lifetime – it brings its experiences to the surface and Yberg has to work with what is there.

feetground_sm_1

feetground_sm_2

feetground_sm_3

I really encourage anyone who’s reading this to take five minutes to peruse through Yberg’s work and see its intricacy and uniqueness. Tell us what you think!

Tagged , , , , ,

The Piano Harp’s Second Chance

I was looking through our website for new submissions and got into that trance many of us have experienced of continuously scrolling down the page, admiring the spectrum of designs. As I was going down, there was one design that forced me to quickly scroll back up. I looked at the thumbnail image again and stared at it for about five more seconds. It was so different but still so elegant – I had to look into the design more.

Piano Bench

Darrell Martin‘s Piano Bench is fearless. It looks like a product that could be placed in a history museum or a very industrial-styled loft in the high-rises of Chicago. According to the design description, the bench is made out of two bedposts, tobacco barn lumber, and – the highlight of the piece – a 1920s Emerson piano harp!

I don’t want this post to be about dissecting Martin’s design but rather discuss the atmosphere and life it can bring into a room. I’m assuming that, like many of our submissions, the materials drove the overall design because quite simply the piano harp is beautiful – I’ve never seen anything like it. Being from the 1920s, the piano harp by itself drives the design to another level beyond it just being aesthetically pleasing. The harp gives the bench a dimension(s) that is so hard to grasp in modern furniture – a dimension of history, which brings with it other dimensions of intimacy, mystery, love, tragedy, and countless more. Who played on the piano before it was destroyed? Where was the piano placed?

Anyways, if I were walking down an aisle full of awesome furniture and the Piano Bench was there, I’d definitely do a double take and spend more time looking at this piece. Frankly, it doesn’t look too comfortable, but it looks so sleek. 

Patinas2013s-sIMG_2314

Patinas2013s-sIMG_2315

What do you think about his use of the Emerson piano harp? Would you put it in your living room? Comment below and check out more of Martin’s unique designs on his page!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Michael Powers, Unbranded Designs Top Influencer

Perhaps you’ve come across his elegant and simple design, non: the table, or maybe he’s commented on one of yours. Michael Powers is a part of our community who has been an essential member in keeping the conversation between all of us who are connected to Unbranded Designs smoothly flowing. Our mission is not only to help designers bring their product to life and to the market, but it’s also simply to connect like-minded (or different-minded) individuals to each other – to create a constant dialogue so that we can also create inspiration, drive, passion, and professional relationships.

Since signing up to be a member of our community last month, Michael and his table design, non, have jumped to the front lines. Currently, non is the third most voted design at 26% after Luna Ikuta‘s Line Light, which is in first at 38%, and Saana Hellsten‘s Slider Stool, which is trailing in second at 36%.

non

non

Though at first glance you may wonder how non has advanced all the way to third in just one month, it becomes clear after reading its background and life-story. In his ‘About the Design’ section, Michael writes, “non is an exercise in using as little material as possible to make a piece of furniture. non is made from seven pieces of scrap steel. powder coated. non. what does a table have to be?” – non is a table that cost Michael nothing, perfectly exemplifying Michael’s style of design: “Products which harness complexity to reveal simplicity.” He embraces the challenge to create his designs using materials that have been thrown away as he says in one of his replies to a comment about non – “In the past couple years I have been increasingly getting into ‘upcycling’ as it were, and looking for opportunities for reusing old materials has become part of my daily observations as a designer.”

So, check out Michael’s design and vote for it if you want to see it on the shelves! If you want to have a profile on our blog, vote more, comment more, and submit more pieces! We’d love to see you join the conversation and get involved in the community.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: