Tag Archives: independent design

One Shot

It always brings a wonderful feeling to come across a product that’s functional and still materialistically lean. It inspires something inside to heighten the push to create bolder, cleaner, and simpler design solutions.

ONE-SHOT_06_1_1383671068

Jasheng Wong, one of our Unbranded Designers, is the craftsman of the recently popular piece, One Shot. It’s sudden increase in likes from our community from jumping to one of the top three submissions is a testament to its wonderful design. The part that makes this piece incredible is the fact that the product is built with one piece of sheet iron. And on top of that, it only requires three simple manufacturing processes to complete it – laser cutting, metal stamping, and bending. It’s hard to get any better than that. From a manufacturing and production point of view, One Shot is golden. The design also holds a limitless number of smooth and clean lines and geometric shapes that are amplified or hidden depending on your point of view.

ONE-SHOT_JashengWang_additional_1383671068

From reviewing the comments, however, there are some worries that Wong’s design is more unstable than it should be. Our Unbranded Designer, Seizmic Design wrote, “Materials are certainly your biggest concern. In a close second is going to be the strength of that break at the bottom trying to support all the physics going on above. One solution might be to have two or three feet instead of just one. One way this could perhaps be done is by breaking the center foot only out of the back and breaking two feet out of the front. I think you will also wind up having to go from having a perfect radius at the bottom (which looks awesome) to having at least a little bit of a flat area (which wouldn’t look as hot, but would be more stable),” which numerous people agreed with.

Tell us what you think to help One Shot become the greatest version of itself!

ONE-SHOT_05_1_1383671068

ONE-SHOT_03_1_1383671068

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , ,

A Lamp that Makes You Clean the Floor

It’s always a fun experience when a piece of furniture or lighting allows (or perhaps ‘forces’ is a better word) the user to perform an action for it to properly operate. Designer Arthur Xin created a clever way for users of his lean and modern lamp to clean their floors.

moving_light

At first sight, you can’t tell that there is something different about this piece. But after a couple of days (or however long the power lasts) you’ll notice that the light will begin to dim as time goes on. There is no cord or charging mechanism. So what are you supposed to do? To make the lamp brighter again the user has to actually mop his floor with the lamp. The bending motion of lamp, the handle of the mop, is a source of kinetic energy which is then stored to as power. Clever, right? To mess with your mind even more, Xin wanted to portray a larger meaning to this product – wash away the bad to create positive energy.

moving_light3

moving_light2

NOTE: There is a possibility that your lamp will smell….

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

The Cradle Chair

At first glance, this hemispherical chair (if you can even call it a chair – it’s more of a curved bed) may seem like something whimsically pulled out of a child’s imagination. However, the Cradle Chair, designed by Richard Clarkson, is much more than just a ridiculously comfortable piece of furniture.

ozartsetc_cradle-chair_richard-clarkson_04-e1345660910846

ozartsetc_cradle-chair_richard-clarkson_00-e1345660997473

ozartsetc_cradle-chair_richard-clarkson_02-e1345660663970

The motivation behind the Cradle Chair is actually from individuals suffering from Autism and Rhythmic Movement Disorder (RMD). In his portfolio, Clarkson states, “It is about creating a safe, comfortable, and relaxing space in which the user can dissipate the overstimulation of their senses… We had a strong focus creating a solution for sufferers of RMD but the chair is not exclusively for them and will bring relaxation, comfort, and calmness to anyone who uses it.”

ozartsetc_cradle-chair_richard-clarkson_03-e1345660837770

This is Industrial Design at its finest. Clarkson not only created something for the masses that looks aesthetically pleasing and feels warm and inviting. But it is also disruptive in its form, which brings even more people to stare at it and eventually want to experience and buy it. But on another level, this piece serves a very specific purpose – it satisfies the needs of the the clients, who in this case are those with Autism and RMD.

What do you think?

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Minimal Coat Rack for the Younger Generation

Many designers have played with the idea of a coat rack from hooks on a wall to a stand with protruding arms to awkward tables that don’t really seem like coat racks at all. This design called “Coat Rack for Bonnie” by designer Annabelle Nichols definitely surpasses all previous designs in its simplicity and minimalism.

rack_02

This design focused on four main object: keys, shoes, books, and coats. One of Nichols overarching goals in this project was to create habits from design – she aimed to find a home for these objects that are easily overseen and strive for attention in an overclutterd house. At first glance, you may be a bit lost at how such an ’empty’ structure could house all of these objects, but that is the beauty of it. The piece is made only out of four main components – white steel, wooden dowels, a wooden shelf, and 3D printed porcelain bowl. And another perk of this design is you only need for screws to assemble everything. The dowels are simply placed through the colinear holes of the steel frame and wooden shelf, creating a liberating and whimsical nature to the piece.

rack_04

rack_01

rack_03

rack_07

What setting do you think this would be best in? College dorm, urban apartment, high rise in Chicago? Tell us what you think!

Tagged , , , , , ,

Motorola Mobility’s Design Challenge Winner: Adam Owens

After almost a month after announcing the challenge, we are extremely excited to announce that the winner of Motorola Mobility’s Reception Desk Design Challenge is Adam Owens! Born and raised in Austin, TX, Owens was constantly in the shadow of construction sites with his dad, being exposed to industrial manufacturing processes (the most prominent being concrete processing). As a result of his upbringing, although Owens graduated with a B.S. in Mathematics, he ultimately became a freelance artist/designer after spending two semesters in architecture school.

For his submission piece, Owens created a desk that we detailed in an earlier post as having minimalist and Wabi-Sabi qualities. The judges of the competition seemed to agree. Steve Monaco, the Real Estate Operations Manager of Motorola Mobility and judge of the Design Challenge (who also received a BA and Master’s Degree in Architecture), states that Owens’ desk “gives tribute to our manufacturing approach because the different components of the desk are made off-site, shipped to the reception area and assembled in place.” Furthermore, they too were very impressed in the efficiency of how he utilized the wooden frame to create the concrete legs/cantilevers as the main surface for the desk. Monaco responds, saying, “We love the idea that the concrete is poured and the wood formwork is reused as the desk surface . . . innovative and sustainable – nothing was wasted or over-designed.”

Owens’ desk will be the front desk at Motorola Mobility’s division in Fort Worth, TX where they will be assembling their new flagship phone, the Moto X. Congratulations, Adam!

Adam 1

Adam 2

I would also like to give recognition to our three other finalists, Christina Fehan, Javier Velez, and Zac Lindemann, for the their beautiful designs as well. Please check all of them out!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

NY Design Week in Review (Part 3), Why designers attend

Part 1 and Part 2 of our review of NY Design Week.

Since this was our first trip to ICFF, we had a number of questions regarding the event including price, timing, trade vs. non-trade, etc. As we were hastily registering for the event, waiting for a credit card screen or some explanation, we had marked down Unbranded Designs as a retailer. We’re a retailer from the basis we sell furniture to consumers, but we think of ourselves as so much more. We consider ourselves a tech company since we’re exclusively web-based. We are a design company due to our community of designers. We could even be considered a manufacturer because we manage a supply chain and source components of our designs from different vendors, sometimes completing assembly. And yes, we’re definitely an e-commerce retailer.

In this instance it was in our benefit to select retailer because it afforded us the opportunity to have several engaging conversations with designers. The main things we learned about the designers we spoke with at ICFF and Wanted Design echoed what designers struggle with here in Chicago and everywhere else. These designers were all looking for partners to 1) manufacture their products and/or 2) carry their products for sale. These designers exhibited the skills to design magnificent pieces and also had the resources to transport their products to New York City, yet they still needed a major partner to bring their designs to the next level.

Coming to ICFF, we weren’t sure what to expect. We knew based on our early research that this was a problem affecting the furniture design community but perhaps the luster of ICFF had made us assume these designers were vastly different. If they were showing at ICFF, surely they’d have the resources to accelerate their designs.

In reality the designers at ICFF face the issues that all designers face. Marketing, sales, manufacturing, and funding impact need to be done well by everyone. After this trip, we’re even more encouraged by our business model, how we can help designers, the amount of amazing designs we saw, and the number of designers that were interested in getting involved with our company. We welcome all of the designers from ICFF, Wanted Design, and anyone else to sign-up and showcase your work. We’d love to work with you!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: